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Although there are two sides to every story, we definitely believe this article hits the nail on the head.  Charcoal toothpastes are expensive and not as healthy as the marketing would lead you to believe.  Here is the article from QZ.com:

In recent years, toothpastes that contain activated charcoal have become commonplace in drugstores. Their labels reassure potential customers that they’re “eco-friendly,” “herbal,” “natural,” or “pure.” All of these words, which are meaningless in a scientific context, help justify their cost of up to $25.45 (£20) for a single tube.

However, the scientific literature on charcoal toothpastes concludes that they’re likely worse for oral hygiene—and definitely not worth the sticker price.

In recent years, toothpastes that contain activated charcoal have become commonplace in drugstores. Their labels reassure potential customers that they’re “eco-friendly,” “herbal,” “natural,” or “pure.” All of these words, which are meaningless in a scientific context, help justify their cost of up to $25.45 (£20) for a single tube.

However, the scientific literature on charcoal toothpastes concludes that they’re likely worse for oral hygiene—and definitely not worth the sticker price.

The rise of charcoal-activated toothpaste seems to reflect a rise of wellness based on the idea that ancient practices were better than those available to us through large corporations backed by modern science. Activated charcoal was a legitimate toothpaste in ancient Greece, and it still is in some developing countries today. But just because something was used as an ancient remedy doesn’t make it better than modern alternatives.

Consider celery juice, another staple of the wellness movement. Celery is a fine vegetable, and used to be just as popular as kale is today. But from a scientific perspective, its juice simply does not have the almost magical medicinal powers its questionable promotors claim that it does.

Craig Dubitsky, the founder of Hello, a company that sells activated-charcoal toothpaste, told Quartz in an email that his firm has tested its toothpaste’s abrasiveness, and that it is safe for everyday use. He also said it sells both fluoridated and fluoride-free toothpaste because it believes in a customer’s right to choose. 

This is true, of course—we all have the right to choose which products we put in our bodies. However, as scientists investigate this new trend of activated charcoal in toothpaste, it’s becoming increasingly clear that it may not actually be the best choice for oral health.

Original article can be found here: https://qz.com/1622284/charcoal-toothpaste-is-worse-for-your-teeth-not-better/
No copyright infringement was intending with the sharing of this article.

This article is intended to promote understanding of and knowledge about general oral health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment.

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