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Adult braces: Why are more grown-ups getting their teeth straightened?
Adult braces: Why are more grown-ups getting their teeth straightened?
Adult braces: Why are more grown-ups getting their teeth straightened? Once seen as a treatment for teenagers, more and more adults are now wearing braces. Orthodontists say grown-ups are flocking through their doors for teeth-straightening despite it often costing thousands and taking months or years to complete. So what's motivating people to chase the perfect smile?



Depression and stress associated with severe gum disease
Depression and stress associated with severe gum disease
Depression and stress associated with severe gum disease



Meet our new associate dentist, Dr. Susan DeWood!
It is with great pleasure that we announce the addition of Dr. Susan DeWood to the Dugas Dental Team! Dr. DeWood comes with the highest recommendations, great enthusiasm, and extreme compassion for patients. She has a wonderful chair-side manner and will bring a vibrant new energy to our team. We are positive our patients will receive excellent dental care from her. Dr. DeWood will be providing clinical care in our office on Tuesdays 8-5pm, Wednesdays 10-7pm and Fridays 8-2pm as well as one Saturday per month 8-1pm.



Genome-wide analysis of dental caries and periodontitis combining clinical and self-reported data
Genome-wide analysis of dental caries and periodontitis combining clinical and self-reported data
Dental caries and periodontitis account for a vast burden of morbidity and healthcare spending, yet their genetic basis remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify self-reported dental disease proxies which have similar underlying genetic contributions to clinical disease measures and then combine these in a genome-wide association study meta-analysis, identifying 47 novel and conditionally-independent risk loci for dental caries. We show that the heritability of dental caries is enriched for conserved genomic regions and partially overlapping with a range of complex traits including smoking, education, personality traits and metabolic measures. Using cardio-metabolic traits as an example in Mendelian randomization analysis, we estimate causal relationships and provide evidence suggesting that the processes contributing to dental caries may have undesirable downstream effects on health.



ORAL CONDITIONS ARE THE MOST COMMON CONDITIONS OF HUMANKIND
ORAL CONDITIONS ARE THE MOST COMMON CONDITIONS OF HUMANKIND
Affecting 3.9 billion people, untreated oral disease is a worldwide issue affecting more than half of the population. According to the Global Burden of Disease Study (1900-2010), untreated tooth decay is the most common condition among 291 diseases. Holding rank as the 36th most prevalent condition, severe tooth loss affects an estimated 2% of the global population.2



Sugar Addiction: Intense Sweetness Surpasses Cocaine Reward
Sweet taste perception is an innate capacity that depends on two G-protein-coupled subunit receptors, T1R2 and T1R3, located on the tongue [1], [2]. The stimulation of these receptors by diets rich in sweet tastants, such as, for instance, sugar-sweetened beverages (soft drinks, colas, fruit beverages), generates a sensation that most humans and other mammals, including rodents, find intensely rewarding [3]–[6]. Once reserved to a small elite, the consumption of highly sweetened diets is now highly prevalent in developed countries and is escalating elsewhere [7], [8]. Though difficult to estimate, sweet sensations evoked by sugar-sweetened foods and drinks are probably one of the most precocious, frequent and intense sensory pleasures of modern humans [7], [9]. However, the current pursuit of sweet sensations far exceeds metabolic needs and is thought to contribute, together with several other factors [10]–[13], to drive the current obesity epidemic [7], [14].



Charcoal toothpaste is worse for your teeth, not better
Charcoal toothpaste is worse for your teeth, not better. In recent years, toothpastes that contain activated charcoal have become commonplace in drugstores. Their labels reassure potential customers that they’re “eco-friendly,” “herbal,” “natural,” or “pure.” All of these words, which are meaningless in a scientific context, help justify their cost of up to $25.45 (£20) for a single tube. However, the scientific literature on charcoal toothpastes concludes that they’re likely worse for oral hygiene—and definitely not worth the sticker price.



Virtual Dentistry And The Culture Of Technological Control
It is undeniable that virtual dentistry is quite successful for professional uses, such as the various apps that assess dental esthetics. Yet, it seems that we ought to scrutinize how health apps can dangerously tread upon the necessary social space of real-life lessons that parents need to be a participant in. Recent data suggests that children are forgetting to regularly brush their teeth and that 50 percent of parents are not actively engaged in showing their children proper toothbrushing habits. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) states that “dental caries in the baby teeth of children from 2 to 11 declined from the early 1970s until the mid-1990s. From the mid-1990s until the most recent (1999-2004) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, this trend has reversed: a small but significant increase in primary decay was found.”



The Symptoms Of Impacted Wisdom Teeth
The Symptoms Of Impacted Wisdom Teeth
The Symptoms Of Impacted Wisdom Teeth Wisdom teeth are the last four of your 32 teeth to erupt. According to Miami-based oral surgeons Dr. Jeffrey Blum and Dr. Eduardo Nicolaievsky via email, these teeth generally appear between the ages of 17 to 25. When one of these teeth doesn't have enough room to come in normally, it is considered impacted. Teeth may become twisted, tilted, or displaced as they try to emerge.



Is Vaping Bad for Your Teeth? 7 Things to Know About Its Effects on Your Oral Health
Is Vaping Bad for Your Teeth? 7 Things to Know About Its Effects on Your Oral Health
Is Vaping Bad for Your Teeth? 7 Things to Know About Its Effects on Your Oral Health Vaping can have a negative effect on your teeth and overall oral health. With that said, vaping does appear to pose fewer oral health risks than smoking cigarettes. Vaping and e-cigarette devices have become increasingly popular in the past decade, but research hasn’t quite caught up. Although studies are ongoing, there’s still a lot we don’t know about its long-term effects. Read on to find out what we do know about potential side effects, e-juice ingredients to avoid, and more.


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